PDF Dependent Rational Animals: Why Human Beings Need the Virtues (The Paul Carus Lectures)

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Seller Inventory B Alasdair MacIntyre. Publisher: Open Court , This specific ISBN edition is currently not available. View all copies of this ISBN edition:.

Series: Paul Carus Lectures

Synopsis About this title To flourish, humans need to develop virtues of independent thought and acknowledged social dependence. Review : This book represents a "revised and expanded version" of the 20th installment of the prestigious Paul Carus Lectures. Buy New Learn more about this copy. Other Popular Editions of the Same Title. Search for all books with this author and title. Customers who bought this item also bought. Stock Image. New Paperback Quantity Available: Seller Rating:.

New Quantity Available: On the other hand, the second half of the book is stellar Which Rationality? His commentary on family and the parent-child relationship in particular is fascinating. If you are interested in I found the first half of the book on the rationality of animals to be middling, by the high standards I set for MacIntyre. If you are interested in MacIntyre's school of thought, definitely give this a read--it's shorter and more accessible than his prior two books as well which makes sense, as it was converted from the lecture format.

Dec 11, Megan is currently reading it. Mac gives me a serious headache. Organization: thy friend is not Alasdair MacIntyre. Feb 04, Daniel Silveyra rated it liked it. The motivating idea behind the book - that our conception of virtue must be tied to the fact that human beings are often dependent on each other via infancy, old age or disability - is powerful and relevant. The book doesn't pretend to be more than a sketch of this argument and its implications.

(PPT) MacIntyre on Virtue and Care | Ron Beadle - primtionacarkyo.ga

Despite this, I found the sketch to be ultimately unsatisfying relative to the appeal and promise of the idea. I suppose I would have preferred a longer book, or rather, one that had taken longer to wri The motivating idea behind the book - that our conception of virtue must be tied to the fact that human beings are often dependent on each other via infancy, old age or disability - is powerful and relevant.

I suppose I would have preferred a longer book, or rather, one that had taken longer to write. The beginning chapters spend a fair amount of time triangulating between Aquinas' and Aristotle's conceptions of virtue and the fact of human disability; it takes a third of the book to lay down the basic groundwork and you walk away with a long list of caveats and footnotes about work yet to be done. The description of what the virtues befitting our situation as dependent animals would look like is very short by comparison, although the author explicitly doesn't set out to list all or even the main virtues.

Still, you get only a few parameters for how to think about what these virtues would be. Finally, the book ends with a series of prescriptions implied by these virtues for a more just society.


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This makes complete sense but, since the virtues are sketched so briefly, the prescriptions seemed pulled out of a hat and therefore unsatisfying. I'm glad I read the book, I just wish there had been more of it. Perhaps there is?

Dependent Rational Animals: Why Human Beings Need the Virtues (The Paul Carus Lectures)

I need to investigate. A very good book that argues convincingly how independence and autonomy can only be achieved through dependency. The rational thinker is fostered and does not make him or herself independent by breaking loose from one's dependency. The links to animals and how MacIntyre is reasoning about animal intention and so on are also well worth thinking about. Dec 31, Malola rated it it was amazing Shelves: pdf , book-chal , god-in-the-form-of-books.

Interesante libro. Hay partes en que su discurso se vuelve repetitiva. Sep 10, Vagabond of Letters rated it really liked it. Feb 16, Javier rated it liked it Shelves: ethics , classics , philosophy.

Dependent Rational Animals: Why Human Beings Need the Virtues

MacIntyre makes a good argument in this volume about how we humans are essentially dependent, or vulnerable, as well as rational animals. I highly recommend it! Feb 07, Weronika Janczuk rated it really liked it. Intriguing angle to take on the question of virtue, drawing heavily on Aristotle and Aquinas. MacIntyre first considers what "it is in and from our animal nature that we share with members of other intelligent, but non-language-using species, such as dolphins, a consideration designed to show not only that we are right to ascribe to members of at least some of those species intentions and reasons for action, but also that in our own beginnings as rational agents we are very close to their condit Intriguing angle to take on the question of virtue, drawing heavily on Aristotle and Aquinas.

MacIntyre first considers what "it is in and from our animal nature that we share with members of other intelligent, but non-language-using species, such as dolphins, a consideration designed to show not only that we are right to ascribe to members of at least some of those species intentions and reasons for action, but also that in our own beginnings as rational agents we are very close to their condition and that our identity was then and remains an animal identity. A good introduction to the study of human dependence, disability, and vulnerability. May 04, Sancho rated it liked it.

Humans, like other animals, are vulnerable, and dependent on their bodies.


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However, the author explores the differences between humans and other animals. In particular, he focuses on practical reason, which helps humans to function more effectively in comparison. However, another requirement to function well is the ability to receive help from others, especially when one is disabled e. Disabilities need to be considered in any account of human beings Humans, like other animals, are vulnerable, and dependent on their bodies.

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Disabilities need to be considered in any account of human beings. Accounts that consider virtues, and our ability to see ourselves in others, are of real value.


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The author highlights the need to separate ourselves from our immediate desires, that it is difficult for us to know ourselves, and that we are dependent on one another. Humans, as most of us can testify, find it difficult to acknowledge these facts. Interesting book, even though this is not my favorite kind of literature. Apr 02, Ahmaud rated it really liked it. This book feels more like a primer, as there is so much more that the argument for the type of dependence MacIntyre gives could provide.

For me, this book served as a reminder that I need to consider my needs, in accordance with my human and individual nature.

Aristotle on Rational Animals and Humans as Stewards of Nature

Furthermore, all this must be done with the Divine light shining upon me. Where I "reason" from standard to which I appeal to justify any given activity must also be good and proper, and so it too must be evaluated. No independent practica This book feels more like a primer, as there is so much more that the argument for the type of dependence MacIntyre gives could provide.

No independent practical reasoner becomes so without certain dependencies—least of all a good reasoner—and no independent practical reasoner remains a good reasoner without cultivating and sustaining the dependencies that keep her reasoning sharp. Jan 22, Michael rated it really liked it. A thought-provoking analysis of two main themes that MacIntyre has not spoken much of before: disability and vulnerability, on the one hand, and virtues of dependence and independence on the other.

https://en.jucohicapu.ml I really appreciated how he strung together discussion of animal intelligence and virtues of dependence in human beings -- especially those of us who are physically or mentally handicapped who need certain things from others according to MacIntyre, not the central government to help us thrive. I've A thought-provoking analysis of two main themes that MacIntyre has not spoken much of before: disability and vulnerability, on the one hand, and virtues of dependence and independence on the other.

I've learned this well in the past couple weeks when my artificial foot broke twice. I read this before in but did not remember much of it Jan 31, Taryn Janati marked it as to-read. Appeals to ethology are not always welcome in moral philosophy, but we had better get used to them.